Study abroad in Italy - Study abroad program - Study abroad in Florence - Study abroad in Rome

STUDY ABROAD IN ITALY FOR COLLEGE CREDITS - Liberal Arts


Please choose your study abroad in Florence period:
Academic Courses Florence - Fall semester
Academic Courses Florence - Spring semester
Summer Courses Florence


Please choose your study abroad in Rome period:
Academic Courses Rome - Fall semester
Academic Courses Rome - Spring semester
Summer Courses Rome

In addition to the liberal arts and the studio arts courses offered by the Accademia Italiana, US study abroad students may also choose from a wide range of design courses at all levels. The specific fields include course in fashion design, interior and industrial design, graphic design and visual communications, photography and new media, and textile design. Basic level design courses are open to all students while upper level courses will have pre-requisites and a portfolio of works may be required for admittance.




  • ITLN 101 - A1 Italian Language – beginning level

    The instruction of the Italian language, backed up by specialized teaching experience, makes use of innovative methods that make the learning lively and effective. Students are placed in different study groups, according to their level of knowledge.

    The course begins from the most elementary communicative needs, that is from salutations and personal identification. Questions and answers on information relative to the world in which each student finds him/herself, and thus indispensable for every primary need.

    This work is backed up by in depth study of grammar to provide the student with a morpho-syntactical basis. Exercises will include reading of newspapers, games, texts, situational studies, instruments through which the student has the possibility to use the grammatical structures and the vocabulary acquired up until that moment.

    Audio-visuals are used such as films and video clips to simulate typical situations and to stimulate conversation. close
  • ITLN 102 - A2 Italian Language – intermediate level

    Continuation of ITLN 101. Intermediate course in Italian language, grammar, vocabulary and conversation backed up by video presentation of topical situations for conversation and increasing comprehension. close
  • ITLN 201 - B1 Italian language, Int I

    Continuation of ITLN 102 Italian language.
    Advanced course in Italian language Advanced composition skills and conversation backed up by video presentation of topical situations for conversation and increasing comprehension. close
  • ITLN 202 - B2 Italian Language - intermediate level
  • ITLN 301 - C1 Italian Language - advanced level
  • ITLN 302 - C2 Italian Language - advanced level
  • AHMM 210 - History of Italian Renaissance Art
    This course will explore the development of art and architecture in Italy from the late Middle Ages to the High Renaissance period. Through an in- depth analysis of the art and history of these periods, we shall develop an understanding of Italy¹s role in the overall development of Western civilization. Particular emphasis will be given to Florentine Art.
    Florence exhibits to this day a particularly well-integrated conception of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Taking advantage of this, we will use the city as our classroom in order to examine the development of Florentine art and architecture in context. In addition to ³on-site² lectures, classroom lectures will focus on the art produced in other major Italian cities.
    close
  • AHAH 310 - Italian Renaissance Architecture

    Exploration of the achievements of Italian architects between 1400 and 1600 by examining of major figures and typological developments, set in their social contexts. Students isolate critical issues and new work on major figures (Brunelleschi, Alberti, Bramante, Peruzzi, Raphael, Michelangelo, Vignola, and Palladio), scrutinizing monuments in Florence and Rome.
    close
  • AHMI 310 - Life and Works of Michelangelo

    This course will explore the art and architecture of Italy, which was produced by Michelangelo and his contemporaries during the late 15th and 16th Centuries. Michelangelo¹s singular genius dominated his era, and established the artistic trends of his day. Yet many of Michelangelo¹s artistic contemporaries would distinguish themselves as some of the greatest artists in history, combining many of Michelangelo¹s innovations with their own artistic visions. Many of these contemporaries worked in the High Renaissance style, while others explored the more eclectic Mannerist style.

    Through an analysis of both Michelangelo¹s work and those of his contemporaries, we will come to an understanding of the development of artistic styles, the changing role of the artist and architect, and the significance of one of the greatest periods in art history. We will study the paintings, sculpture and architecture of this period from a variety of perspectives. We will examine the aesthetic and stylistic qualities as well as explore issues of social, political, economic and historical contexts. close
  • LIIT 320 - Italian Literature in the 20th century

    To acquaint the student with the history, literature and culture of Italy from the dawn of the 20th century to the present day through a study of the major literary works of the period, with a survey of the poetry, novels, short stories and drama of the period.
    Authors such as Calvino, Pirandello, Morante, Pavese, Svevo, Savinio and Buzzanti will be discussed. close
  • LIIT 321 - Italian Literature 1200 – 1500

    To acquaint the student with the history, literature and culture of Italy from the middle ages to the Renaissance through a study of the major literary works of the period. Authors such as Dante Alighieri, Petrarca, Boccaccio, Ariosto, Tasso and Machiavelli will be discussed. close
  • MSIC 310 - Italian Cinema

    A survey of Italian films are famous throughout the world, Italy seen through the eyes of the most important film directors from Fellini to Tornatore present the life and culture of Italy in the 20th century, as well as a special insight into the history, taken from an Italian point of view.

    Films in English (or in Italian with English subtitles) will be viewed and discussed in a group setting. Research will be done on various directors or styles and attention will also be focused on the most famous Italian actors, from Mastroianni to Magnani, Loren, Troisi and Benigni.

    Films will be viewed according to the period and director. Particular attention will be given to Italian Neorealism and directors such as: Visconti, DeSica, Fellini, Germi, Pasolini, Antonioni, the Tavianis, Tornatore, Bertolucci, Leone, Benigni. close
  • SOIT 360 - Italian Style

    How was Italian fashion born? What is the history of the Ferrari? Why do Italians drink wine with their meals? What did the period of “La Dolce Vita” represent to Rome in the ‘50’s? What are the origins of Italian cuisine?

    Beginning with some of the general stereotypes regarding the image that Italy projects to the outside world, the student will be guided into an indepth analysis of these single cultural aspects to study the sociological reality, the historic and economic factors that have created the particular look, the tastes, the customs and the feeling that is generically referred to as “Italian style”.

    The student will be guided from these basic generic aspects to an indepth cultural study that will include the aspects relative to various disciplines: design, cinema, visual arts, literature, history, folklore, economy, music and theater. Class lectures will include the viewing of images, slides, film-clips, and the reading of exerpts from various literary periods.

    The professor will guide the students to examine these aspects and to discuss them in an informal debate. By the end of the course the student will have accumulated a series of elements that will allow him or her to consider the Italian reality from an informed point of view. close
  • HSET 330 - The Etruscans

    This course will critically examine the historical, cultural and artistic aspects of the Etruscan civilization.

    The goal of this course is to give students a panoramic view of one of the most interesting and suggestive peoples of ancient times, along with a better knowledge of a common heritage. General concepts such as “source” and stratigraphic excavation will be explained.

    The Etruscan civilization, which includes art, language and religion, is the second crucial focus of the course. As a third point some particular and curious aspects such as the Etruscan feeding and the role of the woman in the Etruscan world will be covered. Etruscology is not a history course – it is intended as an interdisciplinary study of archaeology, history of art and history in general. The course will include visits to important museums in Florence; Fiesole and a site visit in Tuscany. close
  • HSTS 330 - History of Tuscany

    To acquaint the student with the history, politics, and culture of Florence from the Etruscans through the Renaissance period, from the Medicis to the Lorena family, relations to Rome, the Popes, and Europe, to the present day. Particular attention will be paid to the Medici period. close
  • HSWR 330 - Women in Renaissance Italy

    This course looks into the many facets of living as a woman in the Renaissance, with a focus on the Italian experience.

    Students examine social conditions and cultural assumptions surrounding the Renaissance woman as daughter, sister, mother, bride, widow, nun and saint, heretic and prisoner, ruler and heroine, entrepreneur and worker, author and artist.

    They engage with various sources, including images, objects, places, and a range of texts (legal, historical, and literary). Famous and learned women such as Christine de Pizan, Isotta Nogarola, Isabella d’Este, and Artemisia Gentileschi, are considered.

    Prerequisite: an introductory course on European history.
    close
  • HSMI 330 - Medieval Italy

    An interdisciplinary approach is adopted to bridge the distance between the contemporary world and the enduringly fascinating Middle Ages.

    Questions of political and religious history are addressed in order to establish the importance of developments in the Italian peninsula. Primary attention is given to such major themes and concepts in medieval culture and society as time, sanctity, health, childhood, wealth and status, punishment, travel, the city.

    By reviewing early texts together with the material culture and monuments of medieval people, the course identifies and investigates their attitudes and behavior during daily life and special occasions.

    Prerequisite: an introductory course in European history or instructor approval. close
  • POIT 350 - Italy in the European Union

    To acquaint the student with the current European economical and political situation and in particular with the role of Italy within the EU. History of the founding of the European Union.

    European politics and the Italian position. Benefits and possible dangers of the new monetary agreement.

    Shifting political and economic positions between the member countries. The future of the Economic Union, the “new entries”. close
  • FDTC 390 - History of 20th century Fashion

    This history of costume course illustrates the outlines of costume use in the 20th century, not only as a simple description of fashion but as an interaction between art, culture and society.

    The study of the history of costume is not only the study of a chronological series of events but a look at fashion in relationship to politcal, economic and social changes, including a reflection of today's society seen through the eyes of a designer who will use such inspiration to create today's fashion trends. close
  • HSWR 330 - Women in the Renaissance

    This course looks into the many facets of living as a woman in the Renaissance, with a focus on the Italian experience. Social conditions and cultural assumptions surrounding the Renaissance woman as daughter, sister, mother, bride, widow, nun and saint, heretic and prisoner, ruler and heroine, entrepreneur and worker, author and artist emerge from various sources, including images, objects, places, and texts (legal, historical, and literary). Famous and learned women such as Christine de Pizan, Isotta Nogarola, Isabella dÕEste, and Artemisia Gentileschi, are examined, without forgetting the anonymous and the infamous. close
  • HSMI 330 - Medieval Italy

    An interdisciplinary approach is adopted to bridge the distance between the contemporary world and the enduringly fascinating Middle Ages. Questions of political and religious history are addressed in order to establish the importance of developments in the Italian peninsula. Primary attention is given to such major themes and concepts in medieval culture and society as time, sanctity, health, childhood, wealth and status, punishment, travel, the city. By reviewing early texts together with the material culture and monuments of medieval people, the course identifies and investigates their attitudes and behavior during daily life and special occasions. close